Yashwant Gad

In the 610-611AD Redi was an important trading port of the Chalukya Swamiraja[1]. Redi Fort was built by the Marathas between 1707 and 1713 part of Admiral Kanhoji Angre‘s line of fort defences built for Maratha Queen Tarabai Bhosale[2] It was later captured by the Portuguese in 1746. The previous Citadel holders, the Sawant clan of Maharashtra, were desperate to regain the fort because of its valuable strategic position on the coast. An attempt to recapture Redi fort was preceded by poisoning the Portuguese Garrison’s fish supply, but the attack was unsuccessful[3].The fort was eventually returned to the Sawants following a peace treaty, but the success was short lived – in 1765 the fort was captured by the British who later sold the land to local people in 1890 while retaining ownership of the fort walls. In 2012, the Fort was the property of Vishwanath R. Patki, whose family had been ‘given the land and the fort as a “gift” by the erstwhile British government in the late 1800s, for services rendered’, according to B.V. Kulkarni, Deputy Director, Directorate of Archaeology & Museums, Maharashtra. In 2016 the Fort was made a Protected Monument, and ‘now it is in our control and we shall prepare a long-term conservation plan which will eventually make it a tourist attraction,’ Kulkarni said.

In the 610-611AD Redi was an important trading port of the Chalukya Swamiraja[1]. Redi Fort was built by the Marathas between 1707 and 1713 part of Admiral Kanhoji Angre‘s line of fort defences built for Maratha Queen Tarabai Bhosale[2] It was later captured by the Portuguese in 1746. The previous Citadel holders, the Sawant clan of Maharashtra, were desperate to regain the fort because of its valuable strategic position on the coast. An attempt to recapture Redi fort was preceded by poisoning the Portuguese Garrison’s fish supply, but the attack was unsuccessful[3].The fort was eventually returned to the Sawants following a peace treaty, but the success was short lived – in 1765 the fort was captured by the British who later sold the land to local people in 1890 while retaining ownership of the fort walls. In 2012, the Fort was the property of Vishwanath R. Patki, whose family had been ‘given the land and the fort as a “gift” by the erstwhile British government in the late 1800s, for services rendered’, according to B.V. Kulkarni, Deputy Director, Directorate of Archaeology & Museums, Maharashtra. In 2016 the Fort was made a Protected Monument, and ‘now it is in our control and we shall prepare a long-term conservation plan which will eventually make it a tourist attraction,’ Kulkarni said.

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